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The Sheriffs are coming … but who exactly are they? - Bankruptcy UK

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The Sheriffs are coming … but who exactly are they?

You might have seen them on TV and marveled at how successful they at getting payments out of debtors, but just who are these people and how do they operate?

To start with, we need to readdress them as High Court Enforcement Officers (HCEOs) and they swing into action once in possession of a High Court writ of control (formerly known as a writ of Fieri Facias or Fi Fa). If you have successfully obtained a County Court Judgement for more than £600, you can apply to have it transferred up to the High Court, at which point the required Writ of Control can be obtained.

The HCEOs initially write to the debtor, but if payment is not received in full during the notice period, the HCEO attends the debtor’s premises to enforce the writ and that’s when you hear the now-familiar ‘I have been instructed by the High Court to seize goods to the value of ..’ and you see the debtors’ faces crumble. All costs are added to the Writ and the Debtors suddenly find themselves wondering why they didn’t just cough up in the first place.

You could, of course, use everyday County Court Bailiffs but they don’t quite have the same clout, fear factor or incentive. Besides, after all the hassle you’ve been through, surely it’s worth the extra effort if only to see the look on their faces as they finally have to cough up.

Bankruptcy UK specialises in guiding people through the bankruptcy process in a no-nonsense, straightforward manner. We will assess your circumstances then submit the bankruptcy application online. call us for an informal chat about your circumstances and receiving bankruptcy help on 01425 600129.

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Bankruptcy UK

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